Local Town Information

About Amherst New Hampshire The Town of Amherst is located in the southern end of the State of New Hampshire in Hillsborough County. Amherst is located on the western edge of the Merrimack Valley and the eastern edge of the Monadnock region. It is conveniently located between the two largest cities in New Hampshire, Manchester and Nashua, less than 15 miles to the downtown areas of both cities

There are two major state highways (Route 101 and 101-A) that pass through Amherst and provide easy access to the main interstate routes in the state (US Route 3 and Interstate 93). In addition, Amherst is less than 15 miles from the Manchester-Boston Regional Airport providing direct and connecting flights  to most major airports.

Bedford New Hampshire Town CenterBedford, New Hampshire, fifty miles from Boston and adjacent to the state’s largest city of Manchester, is viewed as an upscale residential town with a population of approximately 22,000. The majority of Bedford is zoned residential. Many major retailers such as Macy’s, Bob’s Store, Walmart, Target and Lowes are proud to be located in Bedford.

Boasting a highly-educated population with many employed in technical areas of endeavor, Bedford places a high degree of importance on education and has a highly regarded school system. Bedford is home to the Segway and its inventor, Dean Kamen. Saint Anselm College, the University of New Hampshire at Manchester, Manchester Community Technical College, Southern New Hampshire University and Massachusetts College of Pharmacy of New Hampshire are all located within easy commuting distance from Bedford.

Brookline New HampshireOriginally chartered on March 30, 1769 as the town of Brookline NH has been one of the fastest growing towns in the state over the past 25 years. In 1960, Brookline’s population stood at 795 and recently reached 5,000. Located in eastern Hillsborough county, Brookline has managed to retain many of the features of its rural past while benefiting from its close proximity to the shopping and employment opportunities afforded by adjacent Milford to the north and nearby Nashua to the east. Brookline is about thirty minutes from Manchester, NH and one hour from Boston.

Greenfield NH Meeting HouseOriginally known as "Lyndeborough Addition", the area was first settled by the Lynde family in 1753. Separated from the nearest church and school by the Monadnock hills, the residents successfully petitioned to form a new town in 1791, using the name "Greenfield" to highlight the area's level, fertile ground.

In 1953, the Crotched Mountain Rehabilitation Center began operation in Greenfield. Established by Harry Gregg, the facility on Crotched Mountain originally treated for polio, cerebral palsy, spina bifida and other physical and neurological disabilities. A center for adult rehabilitation would open in 1961, and a rehabilitation center for adults with brain injuries in 1986. The complex today provides service to over 2,000 children and adults. In 2004, it unveiled the first wheelchair-accessible tree-house in New Hampshire.

Hollis New HampshireAs with many of the towns on the New Hampshire border with Massachusetts, Hollis is rapidly changing from mixed-use farmland (apple orchards, corn, pumpkins, and other vegetables) to a bedroom community for the 54% of working residents who work elsewhere in New Hampshire, and the 30% who work out of state. Significant new development projects continue to be started, to the concern of some of the longer-term residents who have concerns about pressure on the town's school system and impact on open space.

As of the census of 2000, there were 7,015 people, 2,440 households, and 2,025 families residing in the town. The population density was 221.0 people per square mile (85.3/km²). There were 2,491 housing units at an average density of 78.5 per square mile (30.3/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 96.59% White, 0.44% African American, 0.11% Native American, 1.65% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.17% from other races, and 1.01% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.93% of the population.

Lyndeborough, New HampshireLyndeborough, New Hampshire, originally granted by the Massachusetts General Court to veterans of New England's first war with Canada from Salem, Massachusetts, the area was known as Salem-Canada. John Cram and his family were the first settlers, and established a sawmill in the community in 1736. The name Lyndeborough resulted from a re-grant to a group of people that included Benjamin Lynde, who later became Chief Justice of Massachusetts. This group of proprietors never lived in Lyndeborough and may never have visited the community. For instance, while serving as a proprietor of Lyndeborough, Judge Lynde lived in Massachusetts, where he presided in Suffolk County over the trial stemming from the Boston Massacre.

Manchester, New HampshireManchester is the largest city in the U.S. state of New Hampshire, the tenth largest city in New England, and the largest city in northern New England, an area comprising the states of Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont. It is in Hillsborough County along the banks of the Merrimack River, which divides the city into eastern and western sections. Manchester is near the northern end of the Northeast megalopolis. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 109,565, and its 2012 population estimate was 110,209. The Manchester-Nashua metropilitan area, with a population of 402,922, is home to nearly one-third of the population of New Hampshire. The so-called Golden Triangle between Manchester, Nashua and Salem is home to 608,494, nearly half the state's total population.

Merrimack, New HampshireMerrimack is a one hour commute from Boston, one hour from the seacoast, and one hour from the mountains, placing this thriving community of approximately 27,000 people right in the heart of it all. It is a town rich in history. For example, Matthew Thornton, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, called Merrimack home.

Merrimack was officially incorporated in 1746, a year largely regarded as Merrimack's birthday, although only the southern portion (primarily what is known as Thornton's Ferry) of the current boundaries of town was included in the original town, with the northern portion of what is now Merrimack (primarily what is known as Reed's Ferry) being added a few years later.

Matthew Thornton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, lived and was buried in Merrimack. The Signer's House and Matthew Thornton Cemetery are still located in the town.

Milford, New Hampshire The Town of Milford has a rich history. Separated from Amherst and established as an independent town in 1794, Milford was a prime stop on the Underground Railroad. Located in southern New Hampshire on the banks of the Souhegan River, the town is named after the River's shallow Mill Ford, so called after the many mills at this location in the eighteenth century. Milford is still a favorable spot for business.

Made famous by the thriving granite industry and known as The Granite Town in the Granite State, Milford is home to manufacturing, information and service oriented businesses. The town is also a hotspot for tourism and is especially known for its antique shops and country craft stores.

According to the United States Census Bureau,Milford NH has a total area of 25.3 square miles (66 km2), of which 25.2 sq mi (65 km2) is land and 0.1 sq mi (0.26 km2) is water, comprising 0.24% of the town. Milford is drained by the Souhegan River. The town's highest point is near its western border, on the summit of Boynton Hill, at 814 feet (248 m) above sea level.

Mont Vernon, New HampshireThe town of Mont Vernon is located in the hills of south-central New Hampshire, in the New England region of the United States. Established in 1803, the town still maintains a very rural character while offering proximity to the cultural and recreational activities of the New England area.

Mont Vernon broke away from neighboring Amherst in 1803, following a dispute over the town parish. It later added a small portion of neighboring Lyndeborough.

Mont Vernon's general history follows that of many towns in this region: Originally settled for agriculture, its farms were hard hit after the Civil War when railroads opened up better farming land in the Midwest. Population peaked in 1870 and began to decline. By the late 1890s it had become a tourist town, drawing summer visitors from points south, notably Boston, who escaped the heat in Mont Vernon's hills. At one point it had five large summer hotels, including the Grand Hotel, located on top of Grand Hill.

Nashua, New HampshireNashua is a city in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire. As of the 2010 census, Nashua had a total population of 86,494, making it the second largest city in the state after Manchester.

Built around the now-departed textile industry, in recent decades it has been swept up in southern New Hampshire's economic expansion as part of the Boston region. Nashua was twice named "Best Place to Live in America" in annual surveys by Money magazine. It is the only city to get the No. 1 ranking on two occasions—in 1987 and 1997.

The area was part of a 200-square-mile (520 km2) tract of land in Massachusetts called Dunstable, which had been awarded to Edward Tyng of Dunstable, England. Nashua lies approximately in the center of the original 1673 grant. The previously disputed boundary between Massachusetts and New Hampshire was fixed in 1741 when the governorships of the two provinces were separated. As a consequence, the township of Dunstable was divided in two. Tyngsborough and some of Dunstable remained in Massachusetts, while Dunstable, New Hampshire, was incorporated in 1746 from the northern section of the town.

New Boston, New HampshireNew Boston is a town in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 5,321 at the 2010 census. New Boston is home to the annual Hillsborough County Agricultural Fair and the Molly Stark Cannon.

The town was first granted in 1736 by colonial governor Jonathan Belcher of Massachusetts and New Hampshire. At the time, lands to the west of the Merrimack River, disputed between the two provinces, were treated by Belcher as part of Massachusetts, and he granted the town to several Boston families. It was to have been called Lanestown or Piscataquog Township, but by 1751 they called it New Boston after their hometown. Not all the grantees took up their claims, and the land was regranted 10 years later to settlers from Londonderry. When the town was incorporated in 1763, Governor Benning Wentworth formally recognized the long-used name of New Boston.

Wilton, New HampshireWilton is a town in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 3,677 at the 2010 census.[1] Like many small New England towns it grew up around water-powered textile mills, but is now a rural bedroom community with some manufacturing and service employment.

The compact town center, where 1,163 people resided at the 2010 census, is defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as the Wilton census-designated place and is located near the junction of New Hampshire Routes 31 and 101, at the confluence of Stony Brook with the Souhegan River.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 25.9 square miles (67 km2), of which 25.8 square miles (67 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) (0.35%) is water. Wilton is drained by the Souhegan River, and Stony and Blood brooks. The town's highest point is 1,140 feet (350 m) above sea level, where the east slope of Fisk Hill touches the town's western border.

Windham, New HampshireWindham is a thriving community located in the southern region of the State of New Hampshire in Rockingham County. With a current population of approximately 15,000, the Town offers excellent educational, recreational, and business opportunities. Local access to I-93 and other major routes provide ease in commuting to Boston, Manchester Airport, the Seacoast, and the White Mountains. As a community, Windham consistently maintains its rural, open character with large areas of open space and conservation land throughout; while welcoming influxes of economic development.

Windham has often been referred to as "The Jewel of Southern New Hampshire" relative to the efforts expended by a dedicated group of staff and elected officials toward keeping our level of service high and our taxes low. By consistently maintaining one of the lowest property tax rates in the region, while simultaneously enhancing our infrastructure and services, Windham has fast become a highly sought after location within the nation's "Safest" and "Most Livable" state.

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